moi


exyzee:

“Architecture should speak of its time and place, but yearn for timelessness.”

Le Corbusier .

(via torerrac)

— 1 year ago with 3 notes
fyeahblackhistory:

The Fall of Benin
On February 17, 1897, Benin City fell to the British. On that fateful day in history, the city of Benin lost its independence, its sovereignty, its Oba (king), its control of trade, and its pride. The aptly-named “punitive expedition” totally humiliated the nation. The city was looted and burned to the ground. The ivory at the palace was seized. Nearly 2500 of the famous Benin Bronzes and other valuable works of art, including the magnificently carved palace doors, were carried back to Europe. Today, every museum in Europe possesses art treasures from Benin. The defeat, capture and subjugation of Benin paved the way for British military occupation and the later conquest of adjacent areas with Benin, under British administration, being merged into the Niger Coast Protectorate, then into the protectorate of Southern Nigeria and finally into the colony and protectorate of Nigeria.

fyeahblackhistory:

The Fall of Benin

On February 17, 1897, Benin City fell to the British. On that fateful day in history, the city of Benin lost its independence, its sovereignty, its Oba (king), its control of trade, and its pride. The aptly-named “punitive expedition” totally humiliated the nation. 

The city was looted and burned to the ground. The ivory at the palace was seized. Nearly 2500 of the famous Benin Bronzes and other valuable works of art, including the magnificently carved palace doors, were carried back to Europe. Today, every museum in Europe possesses art treasures from Benin. 

The defeat, capture and subjugation of Benin paved the way for British military occupation and the later conquest of adjacent areas with Benin, under British administration, being merged into the Niger Coast Protectorate, then into the protectorate of Southern Nigeria and finally into the colony and protectorate of Nigeria.

(Source: asunkee, via torerrac)

— 1 year ago with 10 notes
afrologic:

One of the many illustrations by Heath Robinson. His work includes mechanical contraptions that are described as an “innovative” because they made from everday items, and not the conventional materials used for that area.
However I noticed when people living in poorer environments create homes out of anything they find (tin cans, bottles and cardboard box) they are not called “innovative” or even praised for thinking outside the “cardboard box”. Instead they are labelled poor, slum living and in need of charity, however when someone rich or more well off does the exact thing, wasting materials which could be used for something more meaningful it’s called art, sustainable design or they just go they just go crazy with semantics. 
Tell me how this makes sense?  

I helped out with this post loool

afrologic:

One of the many illustrations by Heath Robinson. His work includes mechanical contraptions that are described as an “innovative” because they made from everday items, and not the conventional materials used for that area.

However I noticed when people living in poorer environments create homes out of anything they find (tin cans, bottles and cardboard box) they are not called “innovative” or even praised for thinking outside the “cardboard box”. Instead they are labelled poor, slum living and in need of charity, however when someone rich or more well off does the exact thing, wasting materials which could be used for something more meaningful it’s called art, sustainable design or they just go they just go crazy with semantics. 

Tell me how this makes sense?  

I helped out with this post loool

(Source: questionablespace)

— 1 year ago with 1 note

N.W.A. - Straight Outta Compton (by emimusic)

— 1 year ago
Monument Builders: Modern Architecture and Death by Edwin Heathcote

This book looks at structures and buildings built in response to death. Death can create different, wonderful, dazzling and unique architectural challenges; these challenges tend to more than just representing a physical process but embody symbols beliefs, and culture. Monument Builders depicts this phenomenon that a lot people tend to avoid, because it’s based on the topic of death, the concept necropolis is not something discussed a lot in the architectural world. The book however represents different views of death and how death is expresses throughout the 20th Century, ranging from neo-classical ideas to holocaust memorials and more projects.

I reccomend this read, because the photos are attention grabbing, and it shows a journey based on the architecture of death, with wide range of architects, showing how different cultures and time periods have different but subtle approach to such a difficult task.

— 1 year ago

Stephen Lawrence Centre by David Adjaye

— 1 year ago

VitraHaus by architects Herzog & de Meuron (by henrichy0205yt)

— 1 year ago
"

HALO

A beam from above and behind the display, shining towards the viewer, creates bright edges.

"

Page 91

The Design of lighting by Peter Tregenza & David Loe

— 1 year ago